New exhibit on display at Cherokee National Prison Museum

By Cady Shaw
on August 24, 2018

The “Cherokee Prison: Post Statehood” exhibit is on display now through January 2019 at the Cherokee National Prison Museum in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. This exhibit highlights how the prison, built in 1875 by Cherokee Nation, was utilized after 1900 when the tribal government was shut down due to the passage of the Curtis Act.

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The 1843 Gathering

By Cady Shaw
on July 20, 2018

Open now at the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum is an exhibit titled “1843 Cherokee Peace Council,” which looks at the famous council meeting, how it came to be and its outcomes. Historians describe it as the largest gathering of native tribes in recorded history, and American painter John Mix Stanley memorialized the event. That painting now resides in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, but a facsimile of it is displayed in this exhibit.

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The Letters of John Ross

By Cady Shaw
on June 1, 2018

Now at the John Ross Museum in Park Hill, Oklahoma, is a temporary exhibition titled “The Letters of John Ross.” The exhibit pays homage to the wordsmith that John Ross was. He was a prolific writer during his lifetime, particularly while serving as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation from 1828-1866. Throughout those years, John Ross wrote and received thousands of letters from presidents, politicians, authors, clergy, friends and family. Many of his letters were preserved and are kept in archives around the world.

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Cherokee history along the western frontier

By Krystan Moser
on March 29, 2018

On Dec. 25, 1817, Major William Bradford and 64 men of the Rifle Regiment, Company A, landed at Belle Point, in what would become the state of Arkansas. Bradford and his men established the first Fort Smith there.

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Russian Prince

By Gina Olaya
on February 26, 2018

Imagine yourself in the late 1800s, Tahlequah, Indian Territory. It’s Monday morning. The sun’s happily shining through a partially draped window. A family of birds, without a care in the world, continue catching unsuspecting bugs just outside your front door. A soft breeze continually taps a tree branch against the windowpane, reminding you it’s time to get up. You yawn. All of a sudden it hits you; today is music day.

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